SOAKING & SPROUTING

beans, lentils, nuts, and seeds (also grains!) can be hard on your digestive system. this is why I love to soak and sprout mine before cooking and consuming. I have been doing this since last year, and notice a huge difference in how my body as well as my kids bodies handle these foods.

I have talked before on my Instagram about sprouting, and I got so many questions about the topic. many of you were also concerned with how difficult the process might be. and I am here to tell you, it is not as hard as it may initially seem. I hope that this simple guide will help! but first I want to take some time to answer the most asked questions I got regarding soaking and sprouting.

Q: can you sprout any bean, lentil, seed or grain?

A: you can soak any of them, and by doing this you will “unlock” nutrients making them easier to digest and nutrient dense. af. some will not sprout because they aren’t truly raw all the time when we buy them, making it so they won’t sprout. but soaking will still be beneficial. also, some types just don’t sprout, see the form below to see what foods are better for soaking only and not sprouting (a lot of seeds and nuts)!

Q: do I need a bunch of equipment or products?

A: not at all! there are bean sprouter’s  that make sprouting really simple, but you can also use a mason jar with cheese cloth, or a colander.

Q: what are the benefits of sprouting?

A: soaking and sprouting increases the nutrients, makes them easier to digest, decreases anti-nutrients, increases protein and fiber, and breaks down gluten. all of these things make the food easier on your digestive system and makes them more nutrient dense.

how to soak and sprout

soak dry, raw item for the necessary time.

drain and rinse with filtered water until water runs clear.

place soaked food in bean sprouter, colander, or jar. if using a colander, place a towel under it and cover top with cheesecloth. if using a mason jar, cover with cheesecloth and prop it inside a bowl so that it can be upside down at an angle.

give allotted time to sprout. if your food does not sprout in the time given, that is okay. as mentioned above some items won’t truly be raw and will not sprout. still use them! the soaking will still be helpful.

trufflecheesecake

make sure you keep your stuff in the fridge, especially after sprouting. I also want to mention this article about sprouts and food safety. my family eats sprouted beans and nuts all the time, and I feel safe with my process. if you do not feel like sprouts are safe, that is okay too!

BREWING KOMBUCHA GUIDE

Kombucha is one of my absolute favorite beverages and something I’ve been brewing myself for four years. I use the deluxe brewing kit from The Kombucha Shop and love it. I’ve used this same brand the whole time I’ve been brewing kombucha. It makes home brew simple and easy which I love.

I know a lot of you feel intimidated when it comes to brewing your own kombucha, because fermented foods can get tricky. I promise you kombucha is fairly simple to brew.

A few rules to keep in mine when brewing kombucha

There are a couple big rules you need to know when making your kombucha.

1. Don’t use metal containers or spoons when preparing your kombucha to ferment. Metal can damage your scoby.

2. Don’t use antibacterial soap or harsh cleaners to wash any of your kombucha brewing supplies. Warm water and vinegar are all you need!

How to do the first ferment

Okay so you’re ready to ferment some tea!

1. Start by boiling 4 cups of water. Remove from heat and add 3 tablespoons organic black, oolong or green tea (or any of these delicious blends!) to the cloth bag that comes in the brewing kit and steep for 7 minutes. If you do not have the brewing kit or a cloth tea bag, use 6-8 tea bags instead.

2. Remove tea and add one cup organic sugar. NOTE: kombucha in the first ferment is very low in sugar. That is because the SCOBY feeds off the sugar.

3. Add tea to your large jar for brewing, then add 8 cups cold filtered water. Check the temperature, it should be between 68-86 degrees.

4. Gently add in your SCOBY and starter tea. This will come with your brew kit, if you do not have a kit, you can make your own scoby, get one from a friend, or buy one. Gently stir once.

5. Test the pH of your kombucha. It should be 4.5 or below. If it’s too high, add a teaspoon of white vinegar and test again.

6. Cover your jar with the cotton cloth and secure with rubber band. Ferment for 7-9 days.

7. Do a taste test at day 7 to see if the batch is ready. You may even notice a new SCOBY growing on top! That’s really good!

How to choose the best place in your home for fermenting your kombucha

The place where your kombucha can ferment needs to have all these requirements:

  1. no direct sun light
  2. low traffic
  3. warm
  4. airflow

Do not choose a cabinet or small closet. At our new house, I chose to leave mine in our master closet. There is no window, its really big with no door, so airflow is great. Plus, it is really warm. It isn’t low traffic, but we have a shelf up so close to the ceiling (as you may have been in my stories!) that I feel like it’s okay. The new house is so bright with soo much natural light, that this was the only real option that didn’t have direct sun light all day!

How can I tell if my booch is ready?

Start doing a taste test at day 7 and then every few days after. If the booch is too sweet, you still have a few days to go. If it is tart/tangy it’s all done! If it’s sour af, it fermented too long and try a shorter time next time.

I do not have and cannot buy the kit from the kombucha shop, what do I need?

I definitely recommend buying the kit. The basic kit is $48, but I do understand that many can’t do that. Here is a list of the basic items you need to brew:

brewing jar

organic tea

organic granulated sugar

SCOBY with starter tea

breathable cotton cloth and rubber band

pH test strips

I also recommend using simple mason jars, or saving old kombucha bottles for the second ferment and drinking your kombucha. That saves a bit of money too and is a great use for those store bought bottles.

In a couple weeks, I will be sharing all about the second fermentation so stay tuned! In the meantime, if you have any questions on kombucha, message me on Instagram!

*product was gifted to me by the kombucha Shop, a company I have been investing in and loving for four years.

GRAIN-FREE ROLLS

I’ve currently been loving to bake with almond flour. It has quickly become my favorite grain free flour. It has the perfect texture and these grain-free rolls have made me miss wheat bread a whole lot less. Instead, I’ve been missing them!

These rolls are soft and flakey, easy to make, simple ingredients, and great for any meal. They pair perfectly with a hearty soup, or drizzle on some raw honey and enjoy with a cup of hot tea. I would say take my word for it, but you just have to make these for yourself because they’re so delicious!

GRAIN-FREE ROLLS

1 c tapioca flour

1 1/2 c almond flour

1 t pink salt

1/3 c melted coconut oil (I’ve tested olive and avocado oil and both work well but I prefer coconut oil!)

1/2 filtered water

1 egg

Mix all ingredients together. The dough will be a little sticky, but that’s good! Roll into 12-14 balls and bake at 350 for 25 minutes until tops harden slightly.

Okay now I’m craving these as I drink my hot tea! I hope you guys try these because they’re so good. My whole family gets excited when they see me baking these and they never make it through one night! Please be sure to use #naturallychelsrecipe so I can see!